Interest rates for consolidating student loans

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Student loans are meant to help individuals reach their higher education goals.Because of this, they typically carry lower interest rates than other types of loans and debts.By combining your interest rates, you also lose the ability to employ a favorite tactic of financial planners for paying down debt: targeting the most expensive debt, the loan with the highest interest rate, first.What's more, consolidation typically results in the borrower paying more in total interest because consolidated loans are generally stretched out over a longer period, says Jessica Ferastoaru, a student loan counselor with Take Charge America.2.Learn more about how to take advantage of both student loan discounts. The lifetime limit for this loan combined with all other education-related debt is 0,000.Calculate how to potentially pay less interest on your student loan: Student Loan Interest Calculator Calculate the monthly payments on your private student loans: Student Loan Repayment Calculator If you’re a borrower with little or no credit history, or you have limited income, a cosigner may help you to qualify for this loan and potentially receive a lower interest rate.Please note, from here on out, we consider "consolidation" and "refinancing" the same thing.

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Federal student loans tend to come with low interest rates, especially if they are need-based.

A cosigner is someone who shares responsibility with the borrower for repaying the loan.

The cosigner doesn’t have to be a relative; he or she can be any adult who meets the eligibility requirements.

When you consolidate multiple student loans or refinance a single student loan, you may receive a lower monthly payment with a reduced interest rate or an extended repayment term.

Keep in mind that extending your repayment term may increase the amount of interest you pay over the life of the loan.

Historically, that may have been accurate, since consolidation was often used as a way to lock in a low interest rate on variable-rate loans, says financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz.

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