Dating old brown bottles

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Even then the bottles discussed in depth are so primarily to illustrate the presented information and concepts.

This site instead attempts to help the user determine some key facts - approximate age & function - about any given utilitarian* bottle/jar based on observable physical characteristics.

the pontil is actually broken glass where the metal rod used to hold the bottle while the lip was form was broken off leaving a sharp scar.

Beginning collectors often confuse an Owen's ring with a pontil mark and it is easy to see why this happens.

This dating engine will estimate the age of your glass bottle based on its various attributes.

Enter each of the following attributes of your bottle.

Hundreds of specific historic bottles are used as examples within the pages of this website to illustrate the concepts discussed; with luck you may find the specific bottle you have an interest in discussed though typically you will not.

This page provides some examples of how to use the website (primarily the Bottle Dating pages) to determine the approximate date or date range for various types of bottles made between the early 1800s and the mid-20th century.

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The author created this website as a BLM employee and continues to update and enhance the site in retirement as a volunteer.The bottles used for illustration are a small but diverse assortment designed to give users guidance on how to work a bottle through the dating information to answer the Homepage's primary question #1 - What is the age of the bottle?) to the specific dating questions on the Bottle Dating page are included so that a user can reference the necessary portions of that page.What technology, techniques, or processes were used to manufacture the bottle? Where did the bottle come from, i.e., where was it made and/or used? Where can I go for more information on historic bottles?Since there were hundreds of thousands of uniquely different bottles produced in the United States (and Canada**) between the late 18th century and the 1950s (Fike 1987), it is beyond the scope or even possibility of this site (or website or book) to provide specific details about more than just a tiny fraction of a percent of that variety of bottles.The third picture shows the base of a milk bottle from just after the trun of the century.

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